Coach in edward hirschs poem execution essay

There is a light the color of tarnished metal galloping at its side, and fresh blood is steaming through its throat. At least, this is what I intuit from any poem that stays longer with me than the time it takes to read it.

We forget this truth at our own peril.

He despised losing And loved winning more than his own body, maybe Coach in edward hirschs poem execution essay More than himself. He believed in football like a new religion And had perfect, unquestioning faith in the fundamentals Of blocking and tackling, the idea of warfare Without suffering or death, the concept of teammates Moving in harmony like the planets—and yet Our awkward adolescent bodies were always canceling The flawless beauty of Saturday afternoons in September, Falling away from the particular grace of autumn, The clear weather, the ideal game he imagined.

We would just never say so on the record. The words survival and surviving have become a kind of shorthand for a prescriptive new generation of critics to dismiss something as purely sentimental, plain, or uninspired.

But the last time I saw him He looked wobbly and stunned by illness, And I remembered the game in my senior year When we met a downstate team who loved hitting More than we did, who battered us all afternoon With a vengeance, who destroyed us with timing And power, with deadly, impersonal authority, Machine-like fury, perfect execution.

But this is not why for me I find the poem sufficiently affecting. Almost always they worked. The sun is going down tonight like a wounded stag staggering through the brush with an enormous spike in its heart and a single moan in its lungs. Despite what some others would have us believe, reading a poem is not simply a surface tallying of technique, as there is always a shared emotional aspect to any worthy poem.

He believed in football like a new religion And had perfect unquestioning faith in the fundamentals Of blocking and tackling, the idea of warfare Without suffering or death, the concept of teammates Moving in harmony like the planets — and yet Our awkward adolescent bodies were always canceling The flawless beauty of Saturday afternoons in September, Falling away from the particular grace of autumn, The clear weather, the ideal game he imagined.

Posted by Chris Banks at. To them, I say again: The waves, too, sound like the plunging of hooves, or a wild hart simply crumpling on the ground. But the last time I saw him He looked wobbly and stunned by illness, And I remembered the game in my senior year When we met a downstate team who loved hitting More than we did, who battered us all afternoon With a vengeance, who destroyed us with timing And power, with deadly, impersonal authority, Machine-like fury, perfect execution.

Edward Hirsch Hirsch, Edward - Essay

He achieves this formality—and it is an achievement—by following regular stanza patterns and metering stresses in a given line; in addition, he elevates his diction so that his poetry becomes, in the words of Gerard Manley Hopkins, "the common language heightened.

To quote from the same essay I began with, Gregory Orr writes: He writes in his first sentence: And so he drove us through punishing drills On weekday afternoons, and doubled our practice time, And challenged us to hammer him with forearms, And devised elaborate, last-second plays—a flea- Flicker, a triple reverse—to save us from defeat.

Almost always they worked. I heard later that he died of cancer in his retirement which was troubling for me as he was the single-most physically fit person I had ever seen. Look anywhere in Canada, or the world for that matter, and you will find poems that span the whole spectrum from self-indulgent twaddle to self-effacing ostentation being written and being written badly.

Or he can speak as a diner waitress in Arkansas…. Now, I am not suggesting that poems that are clearly sentimental, plain or uninspired are nowhere to be found. He ends this lovely poem: A poet who truly wishes to introduce either the beautiful or the ugly, the profound or the problematic, into a poem can only do so by adding his own personal experience and private feeling to impress the language.

Hirsch might well have avoided the unfortunate "stag staggering," but one can forgive such a small lapse of taste in a poem so vivid, musical, and richly allusive. Take for example, a poem by Ed Hirsch I first read in his book The Night Parade several years ago and can now be found among the pages of his new and selected poems The Living Fire which came out with Knopf earlier this year click this link for a terrific interview with Hirsch.

And now here is the night with its false promise of sleep, its wind leafing through the grass, its vacant spaces between stars, its endless memory of a world going down like a stag.

There is much to love about this poem: He despised losing And loved winning more than his own body, maybe even More than himself. And so he drove us through punishing drills On weekday afternoons, and doubled our practice time, And challenged us to hammer him with forearms, And devised elaborate, last-second plays — a flea- Flicker, a triple reverse — to save us from defeat.

Because poems can be shared between poet and audience, they also become a further triumph over human isolation.“Execution” by Edward Hirsch The last time I saw my high school football coach He had cancer stenciled into his face Like pencil marks from the sun, like intricate.

Execution. The last time I saw my high school football coach He had cancer stenciled into his face Like pencil marks from the sun, like intricate.

- Edward Hirch's poem Execution touches on various thought provoking and heart touching subjects such as cancer. Hirsch does this by using a common American loved sport football to make connections with the reader. Within the poem Hirsch begins to by building a character for us which was the football Coach who was diagnosed with cancer.

Coach in Edward Hirsch's Poem Execution Essays Words 3 Pages In Edward Hirsch's poem Execution, the All-American sport of football is used to illustrate how a man's beloved high school football coach is matched up with his greatest opponent yet, something that play books and trick plays cannot defeat, cancer.

Apr 14,  · Edward Hirsch Hirsch, Edward - Essay. Homework Help. Introduction The Edward Hirsch poem "My Grandmother's Bed" is a testament to a young boy's love for his grandmother, and the wonder of. Coach in Edward Hirsch's Poem Execution Essays Words | 3 Pages. In Edward Hirsch's poem Execution, the All-American sport of football is used to illustrate how a man's beloved high school football coach is matched up with his greatest opponent yet, something that play books and trick plays cannot defeat, cancer.

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Coach in edward hirschs poem execution essay
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